Welcome to Universal Dialog

How to Activate Multilingual Support in Windows

Displaying and editing text in a language other than your native tongue

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Support for foreign languages in Windows (or any other operating system) can be divided into two separate tasks: viewing support and typing support. You can decide for yourself whether or not you need to enable support for keyboard input for a particular language. If you don’t know the language enough and just want to learn it or have somebody else to translate a page or a sentence for you screen support (viewing only) might be sufficient. Also, it is necessary for obvious reasons to have screen support installed before you can fully appreciate your ability to type in a foreign language.

Installing viewing support for Baltic*, Cyrillic**, and Eastern European*** groups of languages, as well as Greek**** and Turkish***** languages.

Windows 95/98/M

1. From the Control Panel select Add/Remove Programs.
2. Click Multilanguage Support, and then click Details.
3. Make sure a check mark appears beside the language or languages you want to use.
4. Click OK, and then click OK again. You may be asked to insert the media containing Windows 95, 98 or Me operating system installation files (floppy or CD-ROM), or provide an alternative location for these files by browsing the local network.
5. The changes will take effect after your computer restarts.

Installing typing support in Windows 95/98/Me
Baltic, Cyrillic, and Eastern European groups of languages, as well as Greek and Turkish languages.

1. From the Control Panel select Keyboard.
2. Click Add . . .
3. From the list of choices select the keyboard layout and click OK. You can add one keyboard at a time.
4. Select additional options, such as System-wide keyboard switching, Enable indicator on taskbar etc.
5. Click OK. You may be asked to insert the media containing Windows 95, 98 or Me operating system installation files (floppy or CD-ROM), or provide an alternative location for these files by browsing the local network.
6. The changes will take effect immediately.

Chinese, Japanese and Korean languages

In order to install typing as well as screen support for Chinese, Japanese and Korean languages, you have to download and install the file called JAMONDO.EXE from Microsoft, that contains GlobalIME (Input Method Editor). This file enables you to use Chinese, Korean and Japanese languages in Microsoft applications, including Office and Internet Explorer. This file is actually a part of Microsoft Internet Explorer 5, and upgrading to IE5 or running IE5 setup is another way to enable CJK languages capability, as it will present you with an opportunity to install CJK support.

* Baltic languages: Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, using Roman alphabet (same as inEnglish)

** Cyrillic languages: Russian, Belorussian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Bulgarian, using Cyrillic alphabet

*** Eastern European languages: Polish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Romanian,Slovenian, Albanian, Croatian, using Roman alphabet (same as in English)

**** Greek language uses Greek alphabet

***** Turkish language uses Roman alphabet (same as in English)

Windows NT

In Windows NT you don’t have to add Multilanguage Support for the above languages, it is enabled by default. Your pages and documents using any of the above languages should display correctly without user intervention. In addition, you don’t have to enable the keyboard support separately, the internationalization is done in one step. In order to install support for Hebrew, Arabic or some other languages, follow Microsoft’s recommendations:

1. In the Langpack folder on the Windows NT 4.0 CD-ROM, right-click <language>.inf, and then click Install.
NOTE: Some languages require files from the I386 folder as well as the Langpack folder. If you are prompted for the location of a file that is not in the Langpack folder, specify the I386 folder and then return to the Langpack folder the next time you are prompted for a file.
2. Restart your computer.
To enable a newly added language and specify a keyboard layout, follow these steps:
1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
2. Double-click Regional Settings.
3. On the Regional Settings tab, click the appropriate language, and then click Apply.
4. Click the Input Locales tab.
5. In the Input Locales box, click the appropriate language, and then click Properties.
6. In the Keyboard Layout box, click the appropriate keyboard layout, click OK, and then click OK.
The following table lists the .inf files available in the Langpack folder.

File Description

Arabic.inf Arabic language support
Cyrillic.inf Cyrillic-based language support
European.inf Latin-based European language support
Exchsrvr.inf All code page conversion tables for Microsoft Exchange Server
Greek.inf Greek language support
Hebrew.inf Hebrew language support
Japanese.inf Japanese language support
Korean.inf Korean language support
Schinese.inf Simplified Chinese language support
Tchinese.inf Traditional Chinese language support
Thai.inf Thai language support
Turkish.inf Turkish language support
Us_eng.inf US English language support
Vietnam.inf Vietnamese language support

Windows 2000
To add an additional language in Windows 2000, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
2.Double-click Regional Settings.
3. On the General tab, select the check box next to the appropriate language group you wish to install, and then click Apply. The system will either prompt for a Windows 2000 CD-ROM or access the system files across the network. Once the language is installed, Windows 2000 will prompt you to restart the computer.
To enable a newly added language and specify a keyboard layout, follow these steps:
1.Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
2. Double-click Regional Settings.
3. Click the Input Locales tab.
4. In the Input Locales box, click the appropriate language, and then click Properties.
5. In the Keyboard Layout box, click the appropriate keyboard layout, click OK, and then click OK.